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Politics : Caste, The most Divisive Issue, Today and Tomorrow!

A researcher argues, Booming economy may change the dynamics of Caste and politics around Caste system. Most of us certainly hope so, but we do not believe that would happen. 

Look at different organizations and clubs in US, established by Indians working in US. Most of these organizations are polarized and implicitly all members belong to a certain caste. Grouping under a caste, only promote, caste system.  These are all very well educated, in a much better financial conditions. But Caste is something they consider almost equal to Nationalism and next to being patriotic.

And this is election season, you would see strategies, promises and every thing politicians do to win in the elections revolve around Castes.

The debate over caste in the New India is more than academic. India’s leaders are under growing pressure to alleviate poverty and inequality. Now, all kinds of groups are clamoring for what Dalits have had for 50 years — quotas in university seats, government jobs and elected office — making caste one of the country’s most divisive political issues. Moreover, there are growing demands for caste quotas in the private sector.

Mr. Prasad’s latest mission is sure to stir the debate. He is conducting a qualitative survey of nearly 20,000 households here in northern state of Uttar Pradesh to measure how everyday life has changed for Dalits since economic liberalization began in 1991. The preliminary findings, though far from generalizable, reveal subtle shifts.

Mr. Prasad credits the changes to a booming economy. “It has pulled them out of the acute poverty they were in and the day-to-day humiliation of working for a landlord,” he said.

Crusader Sees Wealth as Cure for Caste Bias - NYTimes.com

While quality of living will definitely improve for people from all castes when they are economically strong, it has nothing to do with the Caste itself.

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